Q and A


1. What is the Qanuikkat Siqinirmiut? health survey?

2. Who are the target population for the project?

3. Why a Southern Inuit health survey?

4. What is the southern Quebec Inuit population?

5. What is the Inuit involvement in this project?

6. How long will the project take?

7. How long has the team been preparing for this project?

8. What are the different steps of the project?

9. How long will interviews and focus groups last?

10. Will I be compensated for participating?

11. What are visual methods?

12. When will we get the end results?

13. How are we going to be informed of the progress?

14. What will the data be used for?

15. What languages are going to be used for this project?

16. Is the information I share confidential?

17. Who’s working on the project?

18. Who is the project supported by?

19. What are the benefits of my participation?

20. What will happen to the information shared?

21. If I am interested to participate, partner, or if I have questions, what can I do?

1. What is the Qanuikkat Siqinirmiut? health survey?

This is a research project that will describe the health of the southern Quebec Inuit population.  It is lead by Professor Christopher Fletcher, Laval University and Professor Mylene Riva, McGill University in partnership with the Southern Quebec Inuit Association. The project aims to learn more about the health and wellness experiences of Inuit living outside Inuit Nunangat. Through different research methods, we want to generate information and describe the southern Quebec Inuit health and well-being from an Inuit health perspective to build a knowledge base supporting the development of services with Inuit in the south. Check also our Summary for more details.

2. Who are the target population for the project?

Everyone over 16 years old, self-identifying as Inuk and currently living in southern Quebec

3. Why a Southern Inuit health survey?

The number of Inuit living in the south is increasing rapidly but very little is known about the health of the population. As the population grows the need for culturally appropriate health services increases. The Qanuikkat Siqinirmiut? survey will create the knowledge needed to justify and create health programs to the needs of the Inuit community.

4. What is the southern Quebec Inuit population?

According to our census data, the southern Quebec Inuit population includes roughly 2,200 people; with individuals coming from all four regions of Inuit Nunangat. The majority of the population live in the greater Montreal area, but many Inuit also live around centres such as Gatineau, Quebec and Val-d’Or. The number of Inuit moving to the South has been increasing steadily in recent years. From 2006 to 2011, the urban Inuit population has increased by 76%, compared to 18% for the northern Inuit population. In Canada, about 27% of Inuit reside outside Inuit Nunangat and 20% of Nunavik Inuit now live outside the region. The number of Inuit living in southern Quebec is certain to continue to increase in the coming years.

5. What is the Inuit involvement in this project?

Qannuikat Siqinirmiut? is a community-based participatory project created as a partnership between the SQIA and the university-based research team. Through the SQIA the Inuit community is an equal partner involved in all aspects of the research.

We have also formed a community advisory committee (individuals) to represent the community, highlight its perceptions, needs and questions, and advise us throughout the process, as well as an executive committee (Inuit organizations) ensuring the project is culturally coherent and answers needs of the community.

A community coordinator has also been hired to link the community and the research team, and as much as possible, the employees for this project will be Inuit. See our Statement of Principles for more information.

6. How long will the project take?

Funding for a four (4) year project was granted in July 2018. We expect to complete the project by the end of 2022 or early 2023.

7. How long has the team been preparing for this project?

Although the need for an exhaustive study has been talked for several years, more serious informal discussions began with Montrealmiut in 2016. Umbrella funding was secured in July 2017 to further develop community ties and stronger partnerships. Funding was finally granted in July 2018, and since then, we have been working with the community to develop a culturally appropriate project that is shaped within an Inuit vision of health and well-being.

8. What are the different steps of the project?

This project consists of four phases over a four-year period. The first phase will consist of conducting interviews, focus groups and using different visual and art-based methods to better understand and describe health through an Inuit perspective. This phase will be used to better define the concept of health from a cultural perspective and to enrich a questionnaire on health and well-being, which will be administered during Phase 2. Around 300 people will be asked to respond to the questionnaire. In the first two phases, we will also map resources contributing to Inuit health and well-being, in order to identify strengths and gaps. All questionnaire data will be analyzed during the third phase and validated during the Phase 4. The results will then be delivered and disseminated to the public at the end of the project.

9. How long will interviews and focus groups last?

The length of interviews depends on the person being interviewed. Generally interviews last around one hour.

Walkalongs, interviews where the participant takes the interviewer around the city can take one to two hours.

Focus groups, where a group share about different themes, can vary between three and five hours.

10. Will I be compensated for participating?

Yes. Participants will be compensated for their time. Amounts will depend on the kind and length of activity.

11. What are visual methods?

We will use various methods to better understand the health and well-being of Inuit living in southern Quebec, including Photovoice, a participatory photographic technique that provides a forum allowing communities to express themselves and their reality from their perspective through photography. We will also used Digital Storytelling, consisting of taking photos or simple videos that can then be pieced together to form a short video. Other arts-based methods could be added.

12. When will we get the end results?

Information and partial results will be continuously shared with the community for ongoing validation. The final results should be known by the end of the project in 2022. To mark the end of the whole survey, we will organize a community gathering where results will be shared with the community.

13. How are we going to be informed of the progress?

We have developed an integrated knowledge translation strategy using various communication channels to inform the community, as well as an information-sharing network through the SQIA, Saturviit and our various collaborators. Nipivut the community radio is our first means of communication, as well as our Facebook page and website. Video capsules will be shared on social media, and phone-in and Q&A shows will be hosted both on radio and Facebook. A website, posters, community meetings and involvement at community events will also inform the public. The final scientific report and articles will also be available at the end of the process.

14. What will the data be used for?

First, we should provide a better understanding of the health and well-being of southern Quebec Inuit. We seek to rigorously describe the specific health aspects of this community, to define the determinants influencing community health, and draw a fair picture of the situation, all in a culturally relevant way.

Second, these data should be used as a basis for developing an action plan that focuses on the development of policies, services and projects that will improve the health and well-being of the community and serving their interests.

Finally, we also want to increase the capacity of the community by offering multiple opportunities for participation, learning and employment.

15. What languages are going to be used for this project?

Inuktitut (multiple dialects), English and French will be used throughout the project. Interpreters will be available to allow you to express yourself in the language of your choice.in the language of your choice.

16. Is the information I share confidential?

Yes. Our project has received ethical approval by the Comités éthiques de la recherche de l’Université Laval (# 2018–258), which ensures that each research file respects the participants’ right to confidentiality. All collected information will be confidential—names of the participants will not appear in any reports and anonymity will be preserved during analysis. Before each research activity, the participants will be asked to read a consent statement explaining their rights before deciding if they want to participate. In case of conflict or if the participant has complaints or criticisms, they may contact the Office of the Ombudsman at Laval University at 1-866-323-2271 or info@ombudsman.ulaval.ca

17. Who’s working on the project?

Our team members bios can be found under Team members.

18. Who is the project supported by?

The project is officially supported by the Southern Quebec Inuit Association. Major funding has been received from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and ArcticNet.

Supporting organizations include Makivik Coporation, Ivirtivik Center, Nipivut and Saturviit Inuit Women’s Association of Nunavik. Montreal community organizations Open Door, Native Friendship Center and Projets Autochtones du Québec also support our project and have are valuable allies.

19. What are the benefits of my participation?

Contributing your experience and views to the project and answering the questionnaire will help define the health issues that need attention and the development of appropriate services for the Inuit community.

20. What will happen to the information shared?

The SQIA is defined as the “knowledge user” of the research results access to which is organised by a data management agreement that respects Inuit community control, access and ownership.

21. If I am interested to participate, partner, or if I have questions, what can I do?

We invite you to contact us either by email, phone or via Facebook Messenger. You can also chat with one of our team members at community feasts or community events.

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